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Homemade Ginger Ale

July 31, 2011


Nothing better for heat than a cold drink. This ginger ale requires just a few minutes of prep time, but it also needs two days of wait time. So if you’re hot on Monday, it’ll cool you down on Wednesday. Once you get started, you can keep yourself in perpetual supply by brewing one batch while you drink another.

Here is what you’ll need for this ginger ale:

  • 2L plastic bottle (don’t use glass)
  • Funnel (optional)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp yeast
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tbsp grated fresh ginger root
  • Water to fill

And here’s what you’ll do with all this good stuff:

  • Put sugar and yeast in the bottle
  • Juice your lemon* (I love this juicer)
  • Combine lemon juice and ginger in a bowl. Let sit for a few minutes. Add to bottle.
  • Fill bottle to 1 inch below top with water. Tip back and forth to dissolve sugar.
  • Leave in warm place for 24 to 48 hours, until bottle feels hard when you squeeze it and does not dent in response.
  • Move to refrigerator to stop fermentation. Serve and enjoy.

I leave the ginger in and enjoy the crunch, but if you aren’t a fan of raw ginger you might want to strain it out. Same goes for the lemon pulp.

Using yeast for carbonation results in a gentle, irregular bubble. It makes me realize just how unnaturally strong and regular the carbonation in most bottled carbonated beverages feels. Your first drinks from this bottle will be more carbonated than your last, and your drinks will be more carbonated immediately upon pouring them. These are all true for bottled carbonated beverages, yes, but they’re even more true here.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. Anonymous permalink
    August 10, 2011 8:16 pm

    I’m a big fan of ginger ale so this looks great! What kind of yeast do you use?

  2. Anonymous permalink
    August 10, 2011 8:17 pm

    This looks great! What kind of yeast do you use in this?

    • August 10, 2011 9:16 pm

      It is delicious! I use the same baking yeast that I normally use for bread: Either SAF or Red Star Active Dry Yeast. I buy the bulk packages instead of the little envelopes, both because I use so much and because I find the envelopes often fail.

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